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85 savor Cooking W I P O M E G R A N A T E S Local chefs share their own recipes, along with a warning when using the whole fruit: Don’t wear anything white and avoid using a wooden cutting board when working with pomegranate arils — they will stain. For a mess-free peeling technique, cut the pomegranate in half using a sharp knife, then immerse the halves in a bowl of cold water. Press the arils out into the water; the water will prevent splattering and the plump arils will sink to the bottom of the bowl. Another tip: When a recipe calls for pomegranate juice, make sure to use 100 percent juice from concentrate with no sugar or other juices added. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM Shaun Fenix, sous chef at the Blockade Runner Beach Resort’s East Oceanfront Dining in Wrightsville Beach, has been incorporating pome-granates for as long as he has been cooking. His first res-taurant job was in California, working in the front of the house with his mom while his dad was sous chef. Now he cooks with pomegranates even more since their juice has become readily available. Fenix says the arils require a lot of prep work for little yield, but he uses pomegranates because they are delicious, have a distinct flavor and pair well with wine. “Although my flavor profiles are from all over the world, I love to try new things,” he says. “As an artist, I like to bring that to the plate.” Fenix and executive chef Jessica Cabo use their house-made pomegranate vinaigrette to top the fall kale salad, and Fenix notes that goat cheese is a tasty addition. Cape Fear Seafood Company chef and Wilmington native Ricky Martin has been drink-ing and using pomegranate juice for at least six years. He started buying the whole fruit about three years ago because of his children. This father of three is always looking for healthy snacks, and his chil-dren absolutely love eating pomegranates. “They’re healthy and sweet,” he says, “and fun for a kid to eat.” They also go a long way. All three of his children, ages 6-10, will share only half a pome-granate at one sitting. He also incorporates them into dishes at Cape Fear Seafood Company’s Monkey Junction location, where he has been a chef since 2012. Although extracting the arils is a bit labor intensive, they are easy to use as a garnish and interesting and fun to incorpo-rate into the actual dish as well. “There are a plethora of things you can do and fun you can have with pomegranates,” Martin says. Chef Jaime Chadwick adds that the pomegranate, in addition to being versa-tile, offers various medicinal properties. “It’s rich in antioxidants,” she explains. “It can help fight bacterial and fungal infections. Pomegranates con-tain punicalagins and punicic acid, unique substances that are responsible for most of their health benefits.” Chadwick has owned a catering business, hosted the local show “Cooking on the Cape,” and currently owns a grocery delivery business for vacation beach house renters called A Moveable Feast. The mother of two also teaches full time in Cape Fear Community College’s hospitality and culinary department.  “I have a passion for fam-ily, food, and community and love to incorporate all three whenever I can,” she says. “I love using pomegranates sim-ply because they taste super sweet and yummy!” SHAUN FENIX & JESSICA CABO RICKY MARTIN JAIME CHADWICK T H


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