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51 www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM by soft, blurred lines and an atmospheric quality as well as expressive composi-tions and dramatic contrast between light and dark. These scenes went hand-in-hand with “genre” painting, which romanticized and often idealized everyday life, depicting trees, figures and banal structures hero-ically and dramatically. Wexler’s work has similar atmospheric attributes, representing personal homes, public buildings and commonplace human encounters with feeling and gravity. One of his figural paintings shows a seated couple taking a break at Disneyland. In this work, the over-the-top, hyper-real, sensory experience of Disneyland is absent. Instead, the focus is on the small, intimate exchange of two people who have ducked into a corner for some quiet and respite. Rather than detailed portraits, Wexler provides gestures of his subjects, without specific facial features or marked refer-ences to the iconic setting. This allows viewers to place themselves in this sweet, familiar scene or to recall a similar moment in their own past. And, like the Dutch genre painters, Wexler imbues this everyday vignette with importance, and invites the viewer to consider the majesty of the mundane. It is immediately evident Wexler is an artist, and a brief conversation with this immediately friendly and impossibly kind man inspires others to reach for their dreams, challenge the limits of their own creativity, and strive for truth and beauty in their own lives. This personality is reflected in the art-ist’s works, new and old, which leave the viewer with a sense of peace, calm and inspiration. The subtle emotional appeal of Wexler’s paintings of historic buildings and private moments wrap each viewer in a blanket of nostalgia and intimacy, an effect that is both inborn and cultivated in this inspiring and talented painter. “It’s really just been a fantasy life,” he says. “It really has.”


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