Page 42

2017-2

42 WBM february 2017 The best hope to keep the industry alive in Wilmington might be indie films, but they also face challenges. Only projects with production costs of at least $5 million qualify for the grant program, so the small-budget indepen-dents can’t receive funding assistance from the state. “The removal of the incentives has really hit the town hard,” says Tanya Fermin, whose recent film, “The Arrangements,” premiered at the NC Black Film Festival in Wilmington last September. “Most of my filmmaking friends and colleagues have had to take jobs in other industries or simply move away — which has made them less available to independent filmmakers. The independent filmmakers are trying to find their way.” Still, Lewis believes the area is primed to succeed. “Why not Wilmington, why not North Carolina?” he says. “You’ve got the mountains and the coast and every-thing in-between, just like California.” Any success of Wilmington’s inde-pendent industry is contingent upon the hard work of filmmakers and the support of the community, but also reliant on a little bit of good fortune in the right situation. “I really feel like it’s going to take a special project to put this area on the map,” Lewis says. “An indepen-dent film is going to have to get some national attention in order to really show the potential to investors and companies.” Linehan agrees, saying this has been a problem all area filmmakers have wrestled with. “For years, local producers and sup-porters of the film industry have won-dered how they can turn Wilmington into the indie filmmaking capital of the U.S.,” he says. “The answer is to get a major funding source. We have everything we need right here to achieve our goal, but we won’t get there without financing. There is no magic bullet to getting that. It takes talent, perseverance, luck — and a good script with national talent and distribution attached.”


2017-2
To see the actual publication please follow the link above