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Bob Unchester and Holly Fitzgerald were very hands-on with the “A Humument” section of the “Unbound Narrative” exhibit, hanging all 300 pieces. and try to copy them and spend most of my free time sketching and painting, and that led to my decision to go to college for art,” he says. Fitzgerald also was drawn to museums from a young age. “I was always into museums, even as a kid,” she says. “One of my first memories was at age 5, going on vacation with my family to Washington, D.C., and visiting the Smithsonian. But even then, I never really thought of working in museums, I just knew that I liked them and I wanted to go. I was just in the right place at the right time when I happened upon Cameron Art Museum.” She revisited her childhood memories in 2014, when the CAM displayed work on loan from artist Hiroshi Sueyoshi, whose work is part of the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian collection. 27 lation. The visitor first would hear the pages of a book flapping in the breeze. The visual medium was achieved by pairing the sound with an old-fashioned oscillating fan on a pedestal. The complicated installation required a reverse mirror image of video projected on the inside of a wall showing a book with moving pages. The full experi-ence captured a fan blowing the pages of a book, which wasn’t really there. “We thought we could make it work somehow, but we weren’t exactly sure,” Unchester says. Unchester grew up in Edison, New Jersey, and frequented New York City museums with his grandmother. His sister was also an artist. “I would sneak into her closet and go through all of her sketches www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


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