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58 WBM july 2016 ike many on the team, he took the job without know-ing all of the details. “I was not fully briefed,” he says. “They didn’t say it’s a shipwreck. I was told it was a deep ocean research project. It might have been a month or two before I had the pieces put together.” McAfee became good friends with Bond and Cherry, but after he found out the true nature of the mission he couldn’t discuss it. “The secrecy, that was a big deal,” Bond says. “Lance didn’t talk to us about it. We wondered what they were doing out there. After it became known, Lance would tell us about what they were doing.” When he was told the true object of the research, McAfee wanted to make sure the focus would be in the right place. “The party line — and I truly accepted it and embraced it — was we did not want the term ‘treasure hunter’ used or spoken,” McAfee says. “We were doing research. The ship-wreck was a huge human tragedy.” McAfee used the seaplane to fly equipment out to the Arctic Discoverer, which would be at the wreck site for up to one month at a time. “It was spare parts, and ‘please God bring us a new movie,’” McAfee says. “I had a logistics guy who would secure material — hydraulic valves, circuit boards, cigarettes, toothpaste, mail and magazines. If it was small in volume I would take it out in the seaplane and drop it.” It wasn’t a high-tech delivery. The supplies were put in sealed barrels that could float. “From takeoff to the ship was a touch under two hours,” McAfee says. “We’d prop the door open and what I called my bombardier would pitch the stuff out. I would get 20 feet off the water, door open, flaps down, stall warning screaming. As he was throwing it out, I would be making the turn to come back for the second run.” Food and bulkier supplies were taken out to the rig on the 56-foot aluminum-hulled boat that was docked at Seapath Marina. McAfee couldn’t pull alongside the Arctic Discoverer. The size difference was a factor. So was the fact that the larger vessel was continually moving because it couldn’t anchor in the deep water. A Royal Gull seaplane based out of Air Wilmington and piloted by Lance McAfee delivered small supplies to the Arctic Discoverer (bottom, before scrapping). The supplies were dropped in PVC pipes, secured with a lanyard for easy pick up by crews in inflatable Zodiac dinghies in all types of seas. The “bombardier,” who pushed supplies out of an open door (top), was tethered so he would not fall out while the drops were underway. Bulkier goods were transported via the Restless Spirit (top right), the project’s 56-foot service boat that was docked at Seapath. McAfee, who captained the boat in addition to flying the seaplane, can be seen on the flybridge. mother denim for love and lemons lna nicholas citizens of humanity frame denim tom ford rebecca taylor anine bing feel the piece amo rebecca minkoff antik batik b-low the belt j brand vince nightcap iro yumi kim susana monaco joie karina grimaldi susana monaco yumi kim oliver 1055 military cutoff rd | oliverclothing.com


2016-7
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