Gallery Walk

2016-7

Nicole White Kennedy Raleigh, Wrightsville Beach (919) 838-8580, www.nicolestudio.com, [email protected] “Surfing Sisters” 15 inches by 30 inches, oil Winner: Outstanding Figurative Women Painters of the Southeast 2016 Winner: Award of Excellence, NOAPS 2016 52 WBM july 2016 SIMILAR ROMANTICISM is present in Alderman’s painting, and an unmistakable sense of awe and appreciation for the wearers emanates from the soft lines and loose brushstrokes of this piece. Other works in the series were more directly collaborative. “Stranded,” for example, was born when a local friend called with the inside scoop on a boat that had been stranded off Varnamtown’s Sheep Island. The lone, tilting craft makes for an interesting composition and demonstrates Alderman’s skill at representing the faint movement and reflective surface of the Lockwood Folly River. But it also contributes to the air of activism that permeates the entire series. Alderman, who is a member of Brunswick Catch, a local orga-nization dedicated to promoting, highlighting and sustaining the county’s seafood industry, hopes that his work will both honor the people of Varnamtown and educate others about the chal-lenges the traditional fishing industry is facing. He explains that what is occurring in Varnamtown is a microcosm of what is hap-pening up and down the East Coast and to smaller, inland farms. “The more I’ve become involved, the more I’ve wanted to document this way of life, and if I can do anything to help save some of it, I want to,” he says. “It started as an affinity and became more about trying to document this area and its people that literally in five years will be totally different. Part of my job now is to help people understand that.” The unfortunate boat in “Stranded” represents one of the dichotomies central to discussions of Varnamtown’s past and future: that the community’s connection to an aging way of life is both what attracts us to it, and what puts it at risk. The exposed yet majestic representation of this temporarily stranded vessel invokes a similar combination of enduring beauty and unavoidable vulnerability. Alderman’s “Varnamtown: An Aging Life” project is an important contribution to the arts culture of the Southeast. The artist’s careful and skillful rendering of nautical scenes, and masterful evocation of the sense of community, nos-talgia and history necessary to fully appreciate places like Varnamtown, is unmistakable. At the same time, through his collaboration with the Varnamtown community, his use of these paintings to generate support for its future, and his involvement with Brunswick Catch, Alderman continues the important work begun by American art-ists in the 18th and 19th centuries who used their skills to bring attention and appreciation to vulnerable people and places. Without these artists, a visual record of cultures and people who are important to our understanding of U.S. history, and which shape our goals for the future, would be missing. As the artist himself writes, “The Varnamtown project mission is to pre-serve on canvas, and for future generations, the visual history of this way of life.” WA L K Golden Gallery — Cotton Exchange 311 North Front Street, 910-762-4651, www.thegoldengallery.com “A Walk in the Surf” A giclée print from a stormy beach by Mary Ellen Golden Eclipse Artisan Boutique More than 100 local and regional artisans: 203 Racine Drive, 910-799-9883, www.EclipseArtisanBoutique.com Hand blown glass “Blue Baskets with Beaded Detail” For Sale By Owner Pat Bradford: 910-367-1137 or 910-256-5830 “March Snow” by Stephen Sebastian, artist’s proof 75/83. 18.5 inches by 26 inches triple matted and framed. Signed and dated by artist, also inscribed as follows: “Best wishes to a real lady and friend Merry Christmas —1983 Stephen” $1, 800 Privately owned, for sale by owner’s sister. A


2016-7
To see the actual publication please follow the link above