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47 Got Pain? Lunch and Learn, Our Guest Bluewater Grill RSVP 910-769-1356 Wellness Solutions for Chronic Pain Laser Healing Therapy 1602 Harbour Drive, Wilmington NC 28401 Harbour Square Office Park, near NHRMC www.laserhealingtherapy.com • 910 769-1356 Your doctor is a specialist.... is Your lawYer? Lisa Salines-Mondello, J.D., LL.M in Taxation, CELA* Areas of Practice include: • Tax, Estate and Elder Law Planning • Business Succession • Special Needs Planning and Trusts • Medicaid & Asset Protection Planning • Guardianship • Veteran’s Planning • Estate Planning for Second Marriages • Tax & Estate Planning • Probate • Incompetency Planning * Certified as an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation and a NC Board Certified Specialist in Elder Law Helping families preserve tHeir wealtH, one familY at a time. The Offices at Mayfaire II 6781 Parker Farm Drive, Suite 210, Wilmington, NC 28405 910-777-5734 • www.lisa-law.com “What day did he have a brain freeze?” Jackie laughs. Before putting a winch on the boat, Thompson tries to explain why he’s getting back into this difficult business in these uncertain times. “I don’t know what it is,” he says. “It’s hard work. But hard work ain’t gonna kill you. If it did, I’d have been dead a long time ago. I don’t worry about it. Either I make it or I don’t.” Stoicism seems to be typical of shrimpers. Either they make it, or they don’t. Either there will be shrimp, or there won’t. But that doesn’t mean they are ready to see it all end. It might be an aging life, but they are not ready for it to be a dying life. Jackie is president of Brunswick Catch, one of four groups within NC Catch. “A group of locals, shrimpers, restaurant owners, seafood dealers — we all got together to see how we could promote the industry and enlighten our customers about wild-caught seafood,” she says. “About 86 percent of all seafood is imported from Asia and South America, farm raised. People here on the coast have an advantage to getting the local sea-food. When you go into a business, ask for wild-caught, the local stuff. Just ask for local.” Mark Blevins agrees that buying local is a great way to sup-port the industry. “The seafood is delicious,” he says. “We have an incredible diversity of seafood species here on the North Carolina coast. Go to a local fish house. Go and listen. Talk to some folks. The stories are incredible. And they will have recipes for you.” Blevins has developed a deep affection of and appreciation for the shrimpers and other fisherman since he arrived in Brunswick County about five years ago. “These are hard-working folks that love being on the water, and love our coastal resources and want to protect them,” he says. “It’s not an easy industry. It never has been. It’s not growing, that’s for certain. But it’s not dead, and it’d better not get dead. There’s a lot of people working really hard to make sure our North Carolina seafood industry remains a viable part of our coastal industry.” Still, there’s a lot of uncertainty that can make it hard to be optimistic about the future. Nicky is 70. Jackie doesn’t give her age, but says the couple has been married for 48 years and she was over 18 when they got hitched. They’d rather not work into their 80s. But who will take over the business? “I’ve got three grandsons,” Jackie says. “I’m not going to pick and choose.” In the meantime, all she can do is hope that there will always be boats headed out the Lockwood Folly, and back in again with a bountiful catch ready to be dumped at Honey’s Place. “I hope it stays competitive, and there’s plenty of shrimp to be caught,” she says. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


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