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2016-7

SHRIMP BOAT CAME IN YESTERDAY. Garland’s Fresh Seafood in Varnamtown was filled with volunteers heading the little crustaceans, prepar-ing them for the wholesalers who will sell them to local restaurants. There also will be plenty for the retail customers who make their way to this small community on the banks of the Lockwood Folly River in Brunswick County. “This has been the best year for shrimp we’ve had in some time,” Jackie Varnam says with a smile. These are good times — almost like the old days. Jackie cautiously allows herself a little optimism about the shrimping industry. “It’s been the best year in 50 years,” she says. “There’s plenty of shrimp to be caught.” But the abundant spring harvest doesn’t obscure the ominous clouds still gathering on the horizon. These remain troubled times. There are plenty of shrimp — this year, anyway — but not plenty of shrimpers. The shrimp are abundant, but so are the obstacles. Enough obstacles, in fact, to put a once-thriving industry on the endangered list. 39 The High Rider, one of the few remaining 65-foot fishing trawlers in Varnamtown, is hauled up the rails for maintenance outside High Rider Seafood. Right, top to bottom: Nicky Varnam, who runs Garland’s, packs shrimp for a customer. Locals know Garland’s Fresh Seafood better as Honey’s Place. Mark Galloway, captain of the High Rider. The sign outside Beacon One Seafood. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM A


2016-7
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