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PRESSURE CANNER Pressure canners can seem intimidating, but they are quite useful, not to mention safe and essential to people who seriously want to preserve their own food. 1 Follow the same process for sterilizing the jars and lids as instructed in the water bath section. 2Add 2-3 inches of water to the pressure canner. The water in the canner should achieve 140 degrees Fahrenheit for jars filled with raw produce or 180 degrees Fahrenheit for pre-heated produce until all the jars are filled with the recipe and placed in the pressure canner. Follow instructions in the pressure canner manual carefully, because each canner works differently. 3 Wash and prepare the recipe as instructed. Fill jars in the same manner as the waterbath instructions. 4 Place jars into the pressure canner and double-check the water level and temperature. Remember to maintain 2-3 inches of water in the canner at all times or the specifica-tions listed in the manual. 5 Lock the lid securely on the canner but do not cover the vent. The air must be released from within the pot first. Allow the canner to boil for about 10 minutes before attaching the weight. 6 Check processing time and recommended pressure level. Keep an eye on the pressure gauge and adjust the heat as the needle slowly creeps to and stays at the necessary pressure. Set the timer and keep an eye on the pressure gauge. 7 Once the canning time is completed, remove the canner from the burner and allow it to rest as the pressure slowly falls to zero. Do not remove the weight or open the canner until the pressure gauge indicates zero pounds. Even when the gauge read zero, my Mom and I always tilted the weight with a wooden spoon handle until all the steam had escaped. Follow your manual for instructions on how to open the canner. Be careful of the hot steam as the canner is opened; it can cause serious burns! 8 Remove the jars from the canner and place on a towel as mentioned in the water bath process and cover with another towel. Allow the jars to rest, undisturbed, for about 12 hours. 90 WBM june 2016 Mrs. Carolyn Hall’s pepper relish and bread and butter pickles, right, are among the home-canned delicacies sold at the Ministering Circle’s gourmet sale every fall in Wilmington. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALLISON POTTER


2016-6
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