Page 88

2016-6

Pickled vegetables make delicious, healthy finger foods for children like Sasha Gettle. Prevent unwanted jar breakage due to temperature fluctuations by placing each hot canning jar on a wet washcloth-covered saucer. 1 PREP Clean and organize equipment and read the recipe carefully. The workspace and anything that is near the food must be very clean. Wash hands thoroughly, and wipe down all countertops. Gather all equipment and organize. Make sure all needed ingredients are ready. Complete advance prep for vegetables, such as blanching or peeling tomatoes. 2STERILIZE JARS To sterilize the jars, place the home Thrown The North Carolina pottery industry thrives in Seagrove Seagrove is known By Chris Russell Photography by Allison Potter as the pottery capital of north Carolina, and with more than 70 working potteries in the area, the description fits. Daily dinnerware, whimsical face mugs, in between artistic vases, and everything can pot-ters. by be bought or commissioned Their works are seen as far away as the Louvre in Paris and as close as the arboretum and Cameron art Museum in wilmington. seagrove pottery has even been featured in popular movies. The town is located in the heart of the state, a few miles south of asheboro and about 40 miles northwest of Pinehurst. its abundant natural clay deposits have attracted potters for over 250 years. some craftsmen here trace their pottery roots for nine generations. canning rack into the water bath canner. Insert jars, one by one, onto the canner. Fill each jar with water, then fill up the canner with water until there are 2 inches of water above the rims of the jars. Cover and bring water to a boil. The jars must boil for at least 10 minutes to be sterilized. stories matterthat “Take a close look at our magazine and you will see each issue contains Stories That Matter.   The quality of the journalism is unsurpassed; original stories, beautifully illustrated and photographed, created for that particular issue with journalistic integrity. These stories matter today and will still do so 10 and 20 years from now, which is one reason libraries from here to Raleigh have long collected and archived each issue.” — Pat Bradford, publisher blending pencil, watercolor, oil paint and oil crayon, Irwin’s palette is saturated in pigment. “In my later years, I learned to take oil pastel and lay down an area and go back and wash it out,” he says. The idiomatic feathering draws the viewer within an inch of the surface. we tell 48 24 •offshore drilling •seismic exploration •Wind energy •coal ash Four hot-button political and environmental issues penned by some of the region’s finest environmental educators. to adjust the distances closer to shore for the 2017 plan because it would have to start the whole process over again. Oil and gas busi-nesses by Brooks Preik photography by Allison Potter rach on Domonique Launey Enchanted by the music of Mozart at the tender age of two, Domonique Launey seemed destined to become a concert  pianist. Her mother, an amateur classical pianist, and her father, a trumpet and cornet player, instilled in their children a love for the music of master composers, and also an appreciation for the rich musical heritage of the Louisiana Cajun country where they grew up. Launey completed her undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Texas-Austin, where she studied piano. There she took master classes with some of the foremost classical musicians and teachers of the day. She completed her postgraduate work in Belgium as a Rotary International Scholar. She has performed throughout the US, Europe and Jamaica as a soloist, chamber musician and accompanist, garnering many impressive awards in her career including first place in the Wideman International Piano Competition and the Gold Medallion for her solo performance at Académie de Musique in Belgium. She and her husband Dr. Jonathan Hines — also an accomplished musician as well as a physician — moved to Wilmington in 1996. Since that time, Launey has been a central figure on the concert scene in her adopted community, performing regularly for the Music at First series at First Presbyterian Church, in numerous chamber music recitals and as a soloist with the Wilmington Symphony Orchestra. in Louisiana and Texas. What You and your husband have family home? made you choose Wilmington as your specialist and he was recruited Jon is an internal medicine I love the mountains, to this area. He loves the ocean. mountains were not that far away. Of and I knew the Who wouldn’t ? course, I love the ocean too. care r ben favorably afected by moving to this area? Has com-munity your musical tremendously. I was so welcomed by the musical Yes, Lightenheimer, the organist/music here. I met Doug Who is your favorite composer from the past? Mozart. When I was a child I could walk around and sing all of the themes. It intrigued me that he could think of so many. He had endless ideas. If you could spend an evening with any musical celebrity living or dead, who would you choose? Leonard Bernstein — hands down. One of the most creative people ever. And such exuberance. What contemporary classical pianist is your favorite? Emanuel Ax because he always stays true to the style and director at First Presbyterian Church. He told me about the concerts they were starting there and invited me. I was so lucky to have that lovely venue and that beautiful piano, a 7-foot Shigeru Kawai. Steven Erante heard me play and invited me to play a Mozart Concerto with the Wilmington Symphony. Then I met others. I was amazed at al of the concentrated talent here.  You teach in addition to performing. How has your involvement with the Cape Fear Music Teachers Association influenced you? Membership is open to everyone, though mostly piano teachers. I was used to being in a huge association, but this one is a small, wonderful group of serious piano teachers who are totally devoted to their work. That devotion, to me, has always been inspirational. score of the composer. is Though you are blessed with an incredible talent as a pianist,there gor-geous another that you wish for? a always dreamed I would wake up one morning with I voice. If you could travel, all expenses paid, to any city in the world, where would you go? Why? First, Baton Rouge to see my amazing mother, then Vienna would be great to re-experience the opera, the Vienna Philharmonic, museums and striking architecture. number two, fiberglas is a lot heavier than cold mold, cold mold being a wood frame with glas on top of it.” In “busting Through III,” a sportsfish planes above the inlet, casting its shadow on the surface of the water beneath it, throwing spray from the boat’s transom to the right edges of the canvas. The aerial view was shot from a helicopter. This painting, like many others, was rendered from color transparencies inside Irwin’s 1990-built studio. Sensation I, 31 x 49 inches, oil on board. ROBERT IRWIN sAndrA chAmbErs christophEr shAnE michAEl opEnhEim/north cArolinA ArborEtum A variety of forms and glazes by Ben Owen are displayed in his showroom. 88 WBM june 2016 3 STERILIZE LIDS While the jars are simmering, put a cup of water in a skillet over medium heat. Add lids and let them simmer for 10 min-utes. Important: Do not allow the water for the lids to boil. This could harm the gasket, and jeopardize the seal of the jar. 4 PREP RECIPE Mix the ingredients as directed by the recipe. 5 FI L L JARS This is the fun part — filling the jars! Remove them from the canner with tongs, pour any water out of them, and place on a saucer with a washcloth on it. This prevents temperature shock as the hot jar is transferred to a surface in preparation for filling. Put the funnel in the sterilized jar and fill it up by the spoonful or just pour it in there, depending on what it is. WATER BATH 37 WBM www.wrightsvilebeachmagazine.com Mapping the pros and cons of energy production off and on the north carolina coastline. heavy summer reading: An offshore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast. june 2015 36 WBM oil and gas wells have been built in the Since 1940, over 50,000 abandoned, some leaking Today, 27,000 wells are Gulf of Mexico. threatening wildlife, fisheries, public crude oil and unmonitored, where coastal conservation health off-shore and tourism. In North Carolina, the prospect of is tradition and where no offshore wells exist,growing possibility on a slippery fuel development is a fossil slope – albeit not at the hands of coastal locals. The US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) decides every five years where to allow lease permits for drilling off of the US coast. The next lease term runs 2017 through 2022, and offers portions of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) off of the North Carolina coast. North Carolina cannot issue lease permits for off-shore drilling in federal waters. But, North Carolina has authority for proposed seismic testing and drilling applications to review the state’s coastal management program. In April, consistency with Management approved two consistency the NC Division of Coastal data specialist, and submissions solu-tions, from Spectrum Geo Inc., a seismic advanced seismic imaging Technologies, a provider of GX seismic surveying. Two for a first step toward permitting other companies have submitted requests to NCDCM, but await a ruling. All four are based in Houston, although Spectrum’s entire board is Norwegian. Environmentalists ask: How did the federal government, Houston and Norway find themselves determining the fate of North Carolina’s coast? pro-tecting encouraging drilling, BOEM is temporarily While initially state administration, which North Carolina from its own is focused on fossil fuels. BOEM’s plan includes a 50-mile buffer zone along the coast where drilling is prohibited, while encouraging the development of renewable energy and fisheries. As chair of the OCS Governors Coalition, NC Governor Pat McCrory has been pushing to reduce or eliminate that buffer in order to allow drill-ing closer to land. He is correct in realizing 50 miles out, drilling would practically be on the slope of the OCS and would exclude possible reserves closer to shore. At 50 miles out, drilling is much more expensive and more difficult than closer to shore. The governor’s proposal would allow drilling 30 miles from Cape Hatteras, where the Gulf Stream and Labrador currents interact and could disperse any spilled oil over large areas, includ-ing The Point, a significant ecological location and fishing spot near Nags Head. BOEM has stated it would not redraw the leases are looking for existing infrastructure and realize the only logical deepwater ports for onshore oil production are Charleston, SC, and Norfolk, Virginia — not the 600-acre state-owned site near Southport. No matter where the onshore infrastructure is located it will negatively impact valuable coastal real estate with pollution, traffic, pipelines and dredging equipment, and diminish local quality of life and coastal heritage. North Carolina is at a cros roads: fosil fuel dependence or renew-able energy fredom. The Lazard Energy Analysis reveals in the past five years the levelized cost of energy LCOE) for generating utility-scale (energy technolo-gies from leading solar has plummeted 80 percent and the LCOE for land-based wind has plummeted 60 percent. Both solar and wind are cheaper than coal and, in a growing number of places, are more economical than natural gas. Opponents say spending billions developing a nascent offshore extrac-tion program that won’t have appre-ciable returns for another 25 years is irresponsible,consid-ering especially when how the polluting externalities of the drilling industry negatively affect existing coastal economies dependent on healthy environments. Local county governments like Duplin, Robeson and Pender are investing in solar farms that anchor jobs locally and provide cleaner, cheaper energy. Improving effi-ciency, building bike lanes (success-ful PV solar bike lanes now exist in the Netherlands), converting motor fleets to electric and diversifying the renewable energy portfolio are all actions available now, and all cleaner than offshore drilling. Matt Collogan, a graduate from UNCW’s environmen-tal studies program, has worked for a decade as an environmental educator for New Hanover County Parks and Gardens Department. Originally from Silver Spring, Maryland, Matt has lived in North Carolina since 2002. Now self-employed as a farmer, he also sits on the Tidal Creek Cooperative Board of Directors. OIL AND WATER offshore drilling By Matt Collogan 81 WBM www.wrightsvilebeachmagazine.com Q&A 80 WBM february 2015 Domonique Launey at her 1912 Mason & Hamlin BB piano in her Wilmington home in January. art treatise maritime art By Marimar McNaughton From the wilds of Roanoke Island to the back roads of Harkers Island, intrepid artists plunder the coast for subject matter. Time and again boats in yards is a universal theme. RobeRT IRwIn shelved a myriad of careers to adopt the life of an artist. The former cruising sailor and motor yacht crewman found safe anchorage on a sublime slice of paradise amid a treed landscape that screens a woodland studio on property backing up to deepwater near beaufort, north Carolina. “I painted work boats, sailboats, and toward the end, I got very interested in the Carolina flare and the angle you got when stand-ing under them in the yard,” Irwin says. “These big boats are just spectacular.” Randy Ramsey’s Jarrett bay charter boat flagship, Sensation, is one of the boats Irwin painted over and over. “Sensation — the shape of it, the tumblehome transom, the flared bow — it was on the yard a lot off season,” he says. “You don’t realize the undercarriage of these boats when they’re in the water. Secondly you don’t realize how little room is in these boats. because of the way the hull is shaped. They’re meant to go to the bathroom, take a nap and fish . . with tiny little transoms for get-ting big fish in the rear door. They’re fishing machines. The Carolina flare became synonymous with ‘go fast.’ Function first, then design,” Irwin says. “I’m not an expert, I’m simply a visual observer.” Spooning up a taste of north Carolina game fishing history Irwin references the big Rock, a rocky bottom near the Continental Shelf uncovered in the 1940s. Little George bedsworth was the first to fish the rock, says neal Conoley, famed decoy collector, boat book author, erstwhile painter and president of the north Carolina Aquarium Society. “I think George was the one who named it the big Rock,” Conoley adds. Fishing the big Rock used to be a two-day affair until the first marlin of record, a mere 143-pounder, was caught in 1957. “That sort of brought on the big designs,” Irwin says. Fishing the big Rock requires pasage through Morehead City Inlet. “If you’ve never been in and out of it, it’s a trip,” Irwin says. “There’s a wave that comes of of Fort Macon, you have a 30- to 40-foot roler, two or three of them, especialy when the tide is either going out or coming in. I think that’s the beauty of the cold mold design, fiberglas cannot take that kind of punishment, number one; and “It was a progression if you will. The combination of all of it used to interest me when I had dexterity,” he says. Irwin was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease about 17 years ago. He continued to paint for several more years. An assemblage of his work will hang during a one-man retrospective at Carteret Contemporary in July. “I’m not bitter about anything. I had a great run. I enjoyed it while I had it. I miss it,” Irwin says of drawing and painting. “At some point you just can’t go back, you’re not going to be able to replicate what could you do ten years ago.” Low Tide at Taylor’s Creek, 30 x 37 inches, watercolor. 59 WBM www.wrightsvilebeachmagazine.com 58 WBM may 2015 in Asheville hours 44 WBM october 2015 www.wrightsvilebeachmagazine.com 45 WBM Discover small-town flavor with a twist of sophistication. With the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains as a backdrop, Asheville has morphed into more than a destination for outdoor enthusiasts. Known as the “Paris of the south,” the largest city in western north Carolina is a hotspot for farm-to-table restaurants, lively music, arts and crafts, upscale shopping and a wide variety of seasonal festivals. experience 48 hours in Asheville and sample its diverse cultural, historical and culinary fare. Asheville is renowned for the mountain setting. splendor of its But there’s more to the city than breathtaking beauty. Visitors can enjoy music, world-class cuisine, architec-ture, shopping, art, historic outdoor activities. and ExplorEAshEvilE.com ExplorEAshEvilE.com ExplorEAshEvilE.com john wArnEr ExplorEAshEvilE.com by SanDra ChamberS WBM november 2015 25 WBM www.wrightsvilebeachmagazine.com www.wrightsvilebeachmagazine.com From the Cape Fear Region for 16 years Advertise in WBM now! Call 910-256-6569 www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com PHOTOS COURTESY OF EMILEE GETTLE/BAKER CREEK HEIRLOOM SEED CO.


2016-6
To see the actual publication please follow the link above