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P L A Q U E S revealing the lives of typical citizens. A building must be more than 75 years old and located in New Hanover County to be eligible for a Historic Wilmington Foundation plaque. Buildings over 50 years old at Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach and Kure Beach are also eligible. Buildings over 100 years old receive a black plaque. Those 75 to 50 years receive a reddish plaque. Several historic alleys have received a special green plaque. A few years ago, the foundation began recognizing beach buildings with plaques the color of sea oats. One of the foundation’s black plaques adorns the side of the Mitchell-Anderson House, informing passersby that the Georgian-style house was built for Edward Mitchell circa 1744 and is the oldest surviving structure in Wilmington. In Wrightsville Beach, visitors can see Historic Wilmington Foundation plaques on the Churchill Cottage on East Charlotte Street, the Davis-Patteson Cottage on North Lumina Avenue, the John G. Myers Cottage originally on West Salisbury Street and now home of the Wrightsville Beach Museum of History, and the Blockade Runner Beach Resort. The town’s Historic Landmark Commission also issues its own plaques for buildings that are associated with events that contribute significantly to the history of the area, are associated with the life of a significant historical figure, represent the work of a master craftsman or possess high artistic values, or have yielded or are likely to yield important historical information. The designation helps preserve the past; once a property is desig-nated At Carolina Beach, visitors to Havana’s Restaurant can walk up on the front porch and read the history of the building, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this summer. The cottage was built in 1916 by Joseph Loughlin and his wife, Eleanor King. Joseph was the secretary-treasurer and general manager of the New Hanover Transit Company, one of the companies that first developed Carolina Beach. Sadly, Joseph was killed just a few years later in action in France during World War I. 39 The Historic Wilmington Foundation is responsible for the plaques on many build-ings and structures throughout the area. There are nearly 600, and anyone walking through Wilmington’s historic district can’t miss them. Their descriptions are typi-cally 40-70 words and celebrate structures of national, state or local importance, often as a historic landmark, the owner cannot demolish the property, move it, or sub-stantially change the exterior features without the approval of the commission. Plaques from the Historic Wilmington Foundation briefly tell the story of older houses and structures. Black plaques denote buildings more than 100 years old. Clockwise from top left: Morse-Willard-Rhodes House on Ann Street, Wilmington; Loughlin Cottage on N. Lake Park Boulevard, Carolina Beach; Captain John Harper House on S. Front Street, Wilmington; Shore Acres House on Live Oak Drive, Wrightsville Beach and Mitchell- Anderson House on Orange Street, Wilmington. WBM FILE PHOTO www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


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