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Eden’s Parasol, 24 x 48 inches, fabric on canvas, by Molly Scott. cott, an award-winning artist originally from Rocky Mount, North Carolina, incorporates traditional elements of textile art with her own personal style. Scott attended Peace College, and then the School of Art and Design at East Carolina University. As her studies deep-ened, she realized the importance of art history. She switched her major, focusing on the evolution of art. It was from there that her love of quilting began, which provided the inspiration for her current style of turning fabric scraps into works that look like paintings. “When I moved to Emerald Isle in 2000, I started a quilt for our king-size bed,” Scott shares. “I wanted something that personally reflected our life. My husband had a lot of tie-dyes from all of the Grateful Dead shows he attended in college, so I designed a quilt using those and our old pairs of blue jeans stored in the attic. It took two years and 16 pairs of blue jeans to make a quilt so large and heavy we could barely sleep under it.” After finishing the large quilting project, she was left with a lot of leftover scraps and the genesis of a new direction. She incorporated the oddments into a piece that helped form her style. “I use the fabric pieces much like other artists use paint,” she explains. “Each small, ¼- to ½-inch piece can be looked at as a dab of paint. Except, each dab of what I use as paint has even more depth of pattern. So, not only do I work with color, but what pattern fits as well.” Working with diverse types of materials, patterns and textures requires a lot of attention, so Scott developed different focus methods. Instead of creating in silence, she plays music that allows her to con-centrate on her work for longer periods of time. She also learned new techniques to cut materials with razors and scissors to keep from fring-ing the fabric and losing the piece. Next, she had to be meticulous about leveling. Part of the illusion of making a piece of fabric art look like a painting is making sure the materials all lie flat, so that they appear to be one solid construct. “You do not want to have any overlaps that raise the surface of the 34 WBM june 2016


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