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87 Voted Best Vegetarian Food by encore magazine Lovey’s Your LOCAL Health Food Store and Café CELEBRATING 12 YEARS • Organic Produce and Groceries • Salad, Soup, Hot & Juice bars • Cafe • Catering • Supplements • Health & Beauty Aids • Wheat & Gluten-Free foods SpecialS Garden of Life Supplements 30% off Source of Life Supplements 25% off 910-509-0331 Landfall Shopping Center • 1319 Military Cutoff Road www.loveysmarket.com The Restaurant: two fat ladies over a simmering pot 1601 Dawson Street, Wilmington The Bird: BREAST, WING, LEG, THIGH — SOMETIMES THE BACK, BUT DON’T ASK FOR THE FEET. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM co-owners Nicole Play and Gayleane White have been best friends for 26 years. Fifteen years ago, they started cooking out of their homes to make extra money. They took orders and on Fridays delivered dinner plates to hospital rooms and friends’ homes. Nine years ago, they opened Two Fat Ladies Over a Simmering Pot. Nicole Play says she looks for good sales when buying chicken and fresh vegetables for the restaurant. “I’m a mother and if I’m in the grocery store and I see a good sale on chicken, then I’ll buy some for the house and for the restaurant,” she says. She also travels to Fred’s Food Club in Greenville twice per month to load up her trunk with ice and boxes of 50-piece chicken. Back at the restaurant, Play pulls out any visible feathers and cuts away much of the fat from the dark meat — but not too much because, “the fat is the flavor,” she says. After soaking in secret seasoning overnight, the pieces are breaded with flour then fried in vegetable oil. “We cook it just like you would do at home. Flour it and fry it,” Play says. Macaroni and cheese is the most popular accompaniment to the fried chicken. “It’s very rare we get an order that doesn’t have macaroni and cheese as a side,” Play says. “We also do all fresh vegetables. I’m actually snapping beans, cutting corn off the cob, cutting collards and peeling sweet potatoes. I do all of that.” Each order comes with a hoe cake, a flat piece of cornbread. Growing up, Play’s mother and grandmother fried fish weekly. “My mama would make cornbread; but she’d fry it in a cast iron skillet and called it a hoe cake,” she says. Play researched the term and found slaves who didn’t have access to a stove or oven placed the flat part of a hoe in the fire to cook bread. “At the restaurant, we used to bake biscuits and cornbread,” Play says. One day she told Gayleane she wanted to try some hoe cake on the flat grill just to see how people like them. “Ever since that day, if I bake cornbread, like in the squares, people are like, ‘Where’s the hoe cake?!’”


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