Page 15

2015-6

Instead of ➥ Individually packaged foods Pack this ➥ Snacks in Tupperware containers or stainless steel bento boxes, unwrapped fruits & veggies Packaged edibles make for convenient but trashy beach-going fare. Tiny corners, such as those from granola bar wrappers ripped off while opening the product, along with plastic food pack-ages, are among the most commonly littered items at Wrightsville Beach. Instead of ➥ Plastic bags of any size Pack this ➥ Reusable cotton canvas bags Plastic bags are a particularly large threat to Wrightsville Beach’s native nesting loggerhead sea turtles. When afloat in the water, they bear a close resemblance to the adult loggerhead’s favorite food: jellyfish. Plastic bags are also a threat to baleen whales, which filter feed toward the surface of the water, the very place where researchers find plastic debris. Instead of ➥ Plastic beverage bottles, bottle caps & straws Pack this ➥ Stainless steel water bottles Plastics never biodegrade, but when left on the beach, they do break down and become smaller, even-tually turning into microplastics, defined by NOAA as bits less than 5 millimeters in size. These microplas-tics have infiltrated the marine food chain; they are presently found in the digestive tracts of fish, seabirds, mammals and invertebrates. FOOTNOTE: Cigarettes, balloons, glass and fireworks are prohibited on Wrightsville’s beach strand. Instead of ➥ Polystyrene coolers & cups Pack this ➥ Insulated cooler bag, soft- or hard-side cooler Because of its propensity to easily break — while never biodegrading — polystyrene is prohibited for large events requiring a permit on Wrightsville Beach. However, single-use polystyrene coolers are com-monly toted by day trippers and fishermen. Once these begin to crumble, it is nearly impos-sible to remove the bead-sized parti-cles from the environment. 15 www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


2015-6
To see the actual publication please follow the link above