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19 www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM “We see tons of young people in our stores because of peer interest in vinyl,” says Matt Keen, owner of Gravity Records. “Everyone streams music, but if the album is some-thing worthwhile, people will still purchase physical records.” Although most music stores have all but disappeared, record stores like Wilmington’s Gravity Records persevere. The store is a welcome sight to collectors and music lovers who peruse the aisles for classics and hidden gems. “All contemporary artists are putting their records out on vinyl,” says Gravity Records’ employee Ben Rose. “There’s a certain ritual of playing a record. You can’t skip tracks and you learn the concept of the album that the artist intended.” Younger listeners are curious about vinyl records and crave the rich sound they provide. Music sites like iTunes and streaming services produce a compressed tone incomparable to vinyl. The digitalization of music as a medium has stemmed its decline, leaving many record-ing artists with little to gain from releasing music in a conventional manner. In turn, artists have begun releasing their albums on vinyl along with a digital download code for a melding of two worlds. “I think that people realize the sound quality once they hear a vinyl record,” Keen says. “It’s become more of an expression. You can’t show people your music collection over a computer, but you can display your record collection. Music is more than just ones and zeroes.” A R O U N D


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