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94 WBM february 2015 Shelves lined with rows of specialty oils and soy sauces entice shoppers to experiment with Japanese cooking. Muroya carries several types of mochi — chewy Japanese rice cakes — both in plain and sweet varieties. More daring cooks can buy a bag of sticky rice and try their hand at making their own mochi, though Muroya warns it’s a laborious process. “We use a machine,” he says. At a deli counter in the back, Muroya dishes up hot meals like yakisoba, gyoza, miso soup and katsu, along with house-made sushi. Because it’s part Asian market and part restau-rant, diners can experience traditional dishes at the authentic Japanese lunch counter. Tokyo Deli caters to both the culinary adventurist and those seeking familiar comfort foods. “I try and get things that people can recognize, like the rice, the sake, the soups,” Muroya says. “Things that are easy for them.”


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