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93 Tokyo Deli For seaweed and other Japanese ingredients, shoppers can head instead to Carolina Beach Road. There, tucked into an inconspicuous strip shopping center that is also home to a laundromat and a branch of the DMV, the Tokyo Deli serves as a haven for anyone curious about Japanese cuisine. Neatly stocked shelves display an assortment of bottled sauces, several types of rice and packets of dried seaweed. A refrigerator case holds containers of goopy fermented soy beans — a traditional food called nattō; imported ice cream and gelatinous yam cakes. Owners Richard and Tina Muroya bought the business several years ago, but selling Japanese foods to Wilmingtonians has “been an uphill battle,” Richard Muroya says. The city has a tiny Japanese community, so many of his customers are others who want to experiment with Japanese dishes. But he also stocks plenty of unusual items, including jars of seasoned plums, packages of pickled radish, and genmaicha — green tea with roasted brown rice. Tokyo Deli offers a variety of sauces, oils and dried noodles for those looking to create their own Japanese-style cuisine. A cafe serves udon noodle soups made to order. Richard and Tina Muroya, owners of Tokyo Deli, greet shoppers and prepare house- made traditional Japanese food daily. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


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