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“t“The decorations accurately reflect all the natural things that would have been used in a historical setting,” says Tryon Palace research histo-rian Siobhan Fitzpatrick. “In the 1770s they would have had garlands done in boxwood and other greens and decorated with the fruits and berries that were available. All of those natural materials are period appropriate — lemons, apples, pineapples, mistletoe, different ever-greens, artichokes.” With the help of greenhouse manager Freda Pyron, many of the items used are grown on site, although there are things that must be ordered in advance, Fitzpatrick says, because of the sheer volume needed. While many fruits are grown within the palace gardens, it would be a challenge to produce the amount needed for the grand celebration. Fitzpatrick is tasked with researching the annual theme for the cel-ebration and helping develop a plan to bring the era to life. If fabric is going to be draped on the fireplace, Fitzpatrick is the person who ensures that fabric was used to decorate during this period, and the color is historically accurate as well. Ready for a Christmas feast, the dining room, with its Federal inspired table and fireplace pediment, was used for both formal and informal family dining. Right: Most of Gov. Tryon’s books were destroyed, but thanks to an inventory of his extensive collection, Tryon Palace has been able to recreate his holdings in the palace library. 22 WBM december 2015


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